film

Wanderlust Friday {El Camino de Santiago}...

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Last night we watched the film made by Martin Sheen and Emilio Esteves about El Camino de Santiago. "The Walk" was a great scenic film chronicling the story of a man who becomes a pilgrim in the Camino de Santiago to honor his son, an adventurer who died suddenly. Now, all me and my hubby can think of is how to do El Camino at some point in our lives. It looks like such a beautiful way to reflect and relax in nature. Read more about the UNESCO sight, it's truly incredible!

Have you ever done it? I would love to hear all about the adventure! Happy Friday. M

Excellent Documentary - A must see!

As part of an assignment for my Spanish class next week, they will be watching "Which Way Home", an award winning documentary about child migrants who take the risk of traveling north to the United States from various parts of Central America and Mexico. The film was done in a beautiful way so as not to place judgment or political theory on the situation, and only to illustrate the lives of those who travel seeking better opportunities for their families and futures.

I highly recommend the film - a plus for teachers, there are relatively no "bad words" in the entire film, making it "school-appropriate"!

http://www.whichwayhome.net/

A great summary from their website:

"As the United States continues to build a wall between itself and Mexico, Which Way Home shows the personal side of immigration through the eyes of children who face harrowing dangers with enormous courage and resourcefulness as they endeavor to make it to the United States.

The film follows several unaccompanied child migrants as they journey through Mexico en route to the U.S. on a freight train they call "The Beast." Director Rebecca CammisaΒ (Sister Helen) tracks the stories of children like Olga and Freddy, nine-year-old Hondurans who are desperately trying to reach their families in Minnesota, and Jose, a ten-year-old El Salvadoran who has been abandoned by smugglers and ends up alone in a Mexican detention center, and focuses on Kevin, a canny, streetwise 14-year-old Honduran, whose mother hopes that he will reach New York City and send money back to his family. These are stories of hope and courage, disappointment and sorrow.

They are the ones you never hear about – the invisible ones."